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How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right

how do i know if my menstrual cup is in right

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Before trying a menstrual cup, I had a LOT of questions – how do I know if my menstrual cup is in right, how far it should go, what to do if I can’t insert it, and many more. 

Believe me, before knowing the answer to these questions, you won’t feel comfortable using a menstrual cup.

You will feel calmer to try once you know what to expect in different situations. At least, that was the case for me. 

That’s why we will go through some commonly asked questions, including:

  1. How do I know if my menstrual cup is in right?
  2. How to tell if a menstrual cup is open?
  3. How far to insert a menstrual cup?
  4. Why is my menstrual cup uncomfortable? 
  5. Where should the stem of my menstrual cup be?
  6. What to do if the menstrual cup stem is poking? 
  7. What to do if I can’t reach my menstrual cup? /menstrual cup too far up/
  8. Can’t get the menstrual cup in far enough?
  9. Conclusion
How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right - Almost Zero Waste

How do I know if my menstrual cup is in right?

There are a few things that will indicate if you insert the menstrual cup correctly.

1 – A suction sound – If you hear a “pop” or a suction sound, that means the cup is unfolded, and it made the necessary suction seal. 

2 – Stem check – You can also grab the stem and gently pull it. If you feel a suction pressure and resistance, then the menstrual cup should be inside correctly. 

3 – Finger check – If you still aren’t sure, you can insert one of your fingers and feel around the cup.

Touch the edge of it – you should feel a round shape, and there shouldn’t be any large folds. Simply follow the edge around, and see if the whole rim has opened up.

4 – Rotation check – The final thing you can do is grab the base (not the stem) of the cup. Then, gently apply rotation pressure. By doing the rotation movement, you can feel if the cup is open and is correctly inside. It will also help you to remove folds if there are any.

How to tell if a menstrual cup is open?

The menstrual cup must be open as if it isn’t, there will be leaks. The cup is designed to open up once it’s inside.

It also creates a painless suction to your vaginal walls, which keeps it in place and prevents leaking.  

The best way to tell if the cup is open is to insert a finger and move it around the cup gently. This way, you will feel if there are any folds or dents. 

If you find that the cup isn’t open fully and folds, insert a finger and gently push the cup, side to side. In that way, you will give the rim of the cup a bit of extra space to unfold. 

How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right - Almost Zero Waste

How far to insert a menstrual cup?

The whole menstrual cup should be inserted inside, including the stem. You can fold it tightly in half to insert the cup, holding it in one hand with the rim facing up.

Insert the cup, like you would a tampon without an applicator. 

It should sit a few inches below your cervix. However, do not overthink how far exactly it should go.

Just place the whole cup in. And don’t worry – the cup won’t go anywhere. It cannot go up and disappear somewhere inside your body. 

Why is my menstrual cup uncomfortable? 

If your menstrual cup is uncomfortable, there are a few reasons for that. 

First, it can be that you didn’t insert the cup properly.

Second, you might have the wrong size, and if the cup is too big for you – it won’t feel as comfortable.

Third, even though there is a small chance, silicone or rubber material may be causing you an allergic reaction.

If you think it is an allergic reaction – immediately stop using it, and it is recommendable to visit your gynecologist. 

How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right - Almost Zero Waste

Where should the stem of my menstrual cup be?

The stem of your menstrual cup should be inside – nothing should be sticking out. It should be in the lower part – around 1 cm from the vaginal opening. 

What to do if the menstrual cup stem is poking? 

The stem should be completely inside of you. However, if you can feel the stem of your menstrual cup, or perhaps you find it uncomfortable, you can cut it shorter. 

I didn’t cut the stem of my menstrual cup, but we are all different, so if the stem pokes out and annoys you – feel free to trim it.

Do it once you take out the cup. Do not trim the stem while the menstrual cup is inserted.

What to do if I can’t reach my menstrual cup? /menstrual cup too far up/

Sometimes, it might feel hard to get the menstrual cup. This happens to me mostly in the morning, after sleeping with the cup the whole night. The easiest way to reach it is:

1 – Relax – It is essential to be calm and relaxed. If you aren’t, the muscles down there will be tight, so it will be very, very hard to take the cup out. 

2 – Use your muscles – Squat, and squeeze “down” your muscles using your belly/abs. Pressing the muscles will push down the period cup. 

3 – Get the stem – While pushing down, try to insert your fingers inside (make sure you have clean hands) and grab the stem. Pull it a little bit, very gentle. Once it’s reachable, pinch the bottom of the cup so that you can break the suction. Once you break the rim’s seal, gently squeeze it, and pull it out. 

How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right - Almost Zero Waste

Can’t get the menstrual cup in far enough?

If you can’t get the menstrual cup far enough, that can be because:

  • Your muscles are tight
  • You are nervous
  • It is too dry
  • The position isn’t comfortable
  • Your cervix is too low

To fix these issues:

1 – Try to relax as much as possible – Take a deep breath (Really, do it!), relax your body and clear your mind for a couple of seconds. 

2 – Use water or lube – If it’s too dry, it can be hard to insert the cup. You can simply use a bit of water or water-based lubricant on the cup for easier insertion. 

3 – Change the position – See which position is most comfortable for you and in which you are more relaxed. Try different positions like:

  • Squatting
  • Standing, with one leg placed on the toilet
  • Lying on your back with knees wide apart on your bed
  • Lying on one side, one leg bent or in the air
  • Sitting on the edge of the bath/ toilet leaning forward 

4 – See if you have a low or high cervix – It can be that your cervix is very low (especially during the period), so the cup might be too long for your anatomy. If that’s the case, you might need to get a smaller cup. (Find how to measure in the FAQ section in my other article)

Once you follow these steps, fold the cup by using the C-fold, or “punch down,” and gently insert it. 

How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right - Almost Zero Waste

Conclusion

Menstrual cups are fantastic, and all the research I had to do before buying myself one was worth it! 

It might seem scary, weird, uncomfortable, but it is precisely the opposite. So, hopefully, this article was able to answer some of the questions you had. 

If I missed anything, feel free to leave your questions in the comment section below!

Wondering which are the best menstrual cups for beginners? Check my article to find out.


How do I know if my menstrual cup is in right: Infographic –

How Do I Know If My Menstrual Cup Is In Right (infographic) - Almost Zero Waste

2 Comments

  1. Thank you for this! I’ve had a cup for about 4 years and after almost 3yrs bc of pregnancy /breastfeeding my cycle has come back.
    I remember before this being an issue & again now. At the start of the week I can’t seem to get it in place bc there’s blood everywhere and I’m not dry enough. This means I have to ALSO wear cloth pads for a few days. I hate it! What can I do? I’m good on the lighter days, the cup sits just fine but man what a mess!

    1. Hi Shannon! I think it’s best to try to clean all the blood that’s out, before inserting the cup. Have you thought about getting period undies? There are various great brands, that may help. Or, why not keep using the menstrual cup, in combination with the cloth pads?

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